Mercedes Benz 190E 2.5 16v Evolution 1 (1 of 502) Classic Cars for sale at Luzzago 1975 in Brescia
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Mercedes-Benz

190E 2.5 16v Evolution 1 (1 of 502)

C906

Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.5 16v Evolution 1 (1 of 502) - 1989

€ 135.000

Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.5 16v Evolution 1 (1 of 502) - 1989
Under appointment

Description

One of the very rare examples left, exactly the n.48 of 502 EVOLUTION street version created to be able to participate in the DTM.
The first version debuted in 1989, the most graceful and least flashy, however aggressive. This specimen has always been Italian, registered in 1989 in the province of Savona, then later reregistered in 1995.

Evolution use and maintenance manual present.
It underwent important work to preserve its excellent state of conservation from 2018 to 2019. Complete overhaul of the hydraulic suspensions and the entire chassis. All the plastic parts have been replaced trying to preserve the original components as much as possible. The bodywork has been completely repainted with the total disassembly of all the crystals. The upholstery is completely original.

Collector's car binding price.

registered with CRS ASI since 2009.

Model history and curiosity

In September 1988 there was the advent of the second series: a slight restyling affected both the exterior (new bumpers with matching colour, new side panels in plastic colored like the bodywork, modified radiator grille) and the interior (different central console and new upholstery). The engine range remained unchanged, but all 190s now offered a 5-speed gearbox and ABS as standard. The petrol versions over 2 liters had a catalytic converter as standard. Also in 1988, the 2.3-16 saw an increase in displacement from 2.3 to 2.5 liters (2498 cm³ to be exact), becoming the 190 E 2.5-16. This new model delivered a maximum power of 204 hp.

In 1989 the 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution also debuted at the Geneva Motor Show, equipped with a new 2463 cm³ engine, therefore different from the one mounted on the 2.5-16. The bodywork was also modified, with a large rear wing and widened fenders, which strongly characterized this sporty version of the Mercedes-Benz sedan.

In 1990 the 190 2 liter carburettor was replaced by the 190 E 1.8 (115 HP), with an engine with a displacement reduced to 1798 cm³ and fuel injection. At the same time all 190s adopted the catalytic converter as standard. In the same year, the 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution 2 was proposed, an update of the first Evolution, which this time saw the 2.5 twin-cam engine increased to 235 HP of maximum power.

Production ended in 1993, when the first generation C-Class was launched.

190 E 2.5-16 Ages
Called Evo (or Evolution in Italy) and introduced in 1988, this car was equipped with a new 2.5 liter engine, with a displacement of 2463 cm³. The new 2.5-liter unit was designed to have greater possibilities for sports tuning. The maximum power of the road version however remained unchanged at 204 HP, while performance improved slightly. In the non-catalyzed version, the maximum speed reached 235 km/h. Aesthetically, the Evo (as well as the subsequent Evo II) clearly distinguished itself from the rest of the production due to its aerodynamic appendages and widened wheel arches, almost never seen on cars of this kind; it stood out across the large rear wing. To obtain approval in Group A, at least 500 examples are needed: this model was therefore produced in 502 examples. The 1990 DTM ended with driver Kurt Thiim's Evo in third place and Klaus Ludwig's in fifth.


Gallery

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Technical data

Brand
Mercedes-Benz
Model
190E 2.5 16v Evolution 1 (1 of 502)
Year
1989
Mileage
88266 (odometer)
Fuel
Benzina
N. Doors
5
N. of Seats
4
Exterior colour
Black
Interior colour
grey
Gearbox
Manuale
Speed
5 + R
Dysplacement
2463
Cylinders
4
Registration plate
Italiana
Driving Position
Sinistra
KW/CV
172/204
Chassis Number
WDB2010361F614814
Availability
Su appuntamento

Optional

Allory wheels
ASI certified
Disc brakes
Fabric interior
Matching Numbers
SKAI interior
White plate

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